Skip to content ↓

Religious Studies Curriculum 2020/21

KS3 Year 7

Autumn

Storm Glass and Human Rights: Students explore the theme of human rights and social inequality throughout the StormGlass novel.

Being Human: Students enquire into what it is to be human. These ideas are developed through comparing philosophical worldviews on life after death, the existence of the soul and attitudes towards scientific advances.

Spring

Origins and Destiny: By comparing the origins of the world and humanity, students learn various religious and cultural beliefs surrounding the topic. Further investigations are carried out into the purpose of humanity and how the creation stories affect existence.

Ethics: With a focus on philosophical thought, students consider and debate moral dilemmas from ethical perspectives from utilitarianism to Kantian deontology. This unit allows students to develop their own moral position on a wide range of scenarios.

Summer

Comparative Religion: Students research many world religions and how they have developed throughout history, for example, different religions views on life after death and how it compares across the world. Many cultures, including Ancient Egyptians, would bury their loved ones with weapons and money, students compare this with modern day beliefs and practices of the afterlife.

Religion, Philosophy and Entertainment: The final unit of year 7 aims to incorporate all of the previously learnt knowledge and skills of enquiry and apply it to modern media. Students will study a film (The Truman Show or Soul) and take a philosophical and inquisitive approach to discussing how religion and ethics is applied in the modern world.

KS3 Year 8

Autumn

God: Students begin their year by enquiring into the nature of the Christian God and debating His existence and question to authenticity of miracles. This unit allows students to develop and articulate their own views on faith with philosophical support.

Good and Evil: Throughout this unit students look into the different types of evil, their cause and the concept of suffering. By investigating real life situations, such as 9/11 and the Jamie Bulger case, students can develop a sense of morality and begin to understand the many forms of evil and how to prevent it.

Spring

Wealth and Poverty: In this unit students take a deeper look into the concepts of wealth and poverty and how it affects individuals locally and universally. Students begin to grasp what is meant by relative and absolute poverty and how the government, individuals and religious groups tackle these real-world issues.

Society: Students take a deeper look into what a society is and how it is built. By looking at particular cases, such as the BLM movement, students will comprehend concepts of social inequality and how it began and how religious groups and the government respond to these matters.

Summer

Crime and Punishment: Using previous lessons, students adapt their knowledge into understanding the different types of crime, the punishments for each and the factors influencing individuals to commit crime. We study in detail both religious and non-religious attitudes towards lawbreakers and capital punishment.

Peace and Conflict: In this unit students assess the ethics of war and religious perspectives of the nature of war. For example, learners consider whether the pacifist view is fair and attainable or whether sometimes there may be justification for conflict.

KS4 Year 9

Autumn

Introduction to Ethics: In order to introduce students to their GCSE subject, learners will return to looking at ethics in detail with specific reference to animal rights and medical ethics (e.g. should we allow saviour siblings, enhancements). This equips them with written and verbal skills required to thrive in their GCSE subject.

Relationships: This theme requires learners to consider characteristics of relationships, marriage and family life. Through a study of beliefs and teachings, questions relating to issues of relationships in the twenty-first century will be considered, including same sex relationships and gender roles.

Spring

Christian Beliefs and Teachings: The compulsory nature of this component ensures that learners know and understand the fact that the religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian, but also diverse. Students look into the specific beliefs of many denominations of Christians, including Catholics, Anglican Christians and Evangelical beliefs.

Judaism Beliefs and Teachings: Studying Judaism Beliefs and Teachings broadens students’ understandings of other world faiths and views. Students specifically look into the MItvah, Pikuach Nefesh and other essential beliefs that shape the lives of individuals across the world.

Summer

Life and Death: This theme requires learners to consider religious and non-religious beliefs about the nature of life and death and the origins and value of the universe and human life.

Revision and Exam Practice: Students are expected to revise and consider previous units in detail to prepare them for exams and future life.

KS4 Year 11

Autumn

Judaism Beliefs and Teachings: Studying Judaism Beliefs and Teachings broadens students’ understandings of other world faiths and views. Students specifically look into the MItvah, Pikuach Nefesh and other essential beliefs that shape the lives of individuals across the world.

Judaism Practices: Continuing the topic of Judaism into Practices allows students to apply previous knowledge to real world events such as religious festivals and marriage. This allows deeper analysis into worldviews and how practices influence individuals.

Human Rights: This theme considers contemporary issues of human rights and social justice and their relationship with religion and belief. Learners will be expected to consider specific issues of wealth and poverty, racial prejudice and discrimination.

Good and Evil: This theme requires learners to consider philosophical questions concerning the origins and nature of good and evil. Through a study of teachings and beliefs, questions relating to the causes of crime and attitudes towards the aims of punishment and treatment of criminals will be considered.

Spring

Christian Beliefs and Teachings: The compulsory nature of this component ensures that learners know and understand the fact that the religious traditions of Great Britain are, in the main, Christian, but also diverse. Students look into the specific beliefs of many denominations of Christians, including Catholics, Anglican Christians and Evangelical beliefs.

Life and Death: This theme requires learners to consider religious and non-religious beliefs about the nature of life and death and the origins and value of the universe and human life.

Relationships: This theme requires learners to consider characteristics of relationships, marriage and family life. Through a study of beliefs and teachings, questions relating to issues of relationships in the twenty-first century will be considered, including same sex relationships and gender roles.

Summer

Revision for exams: Students are expected to revise and consider previous units in detail to prepare them for exams and future life.